2018-09-13 / Community

VA holds Veterans Resource Day in Bad Axe

By Ben Muir


BAD AXE – Dan Little at the Veterans Resource Day on Friday, Sept. 7. BAD AXE – Dan Little at the Veterans Resource Day on Friday, Sept. 7. BAD AXE - Dan Little, an ex-Army veteran who was a door gunner in 1968, stayed in touch with a few soldiers after the Vietnam War.

“I only went on Facebook for one reason,” said Little, a Bad Axe High School graduate. “And that was to see if I can find guys I was over there with.”

Little was at a Veterans Resource Day in Bad Axe on Friday, browsing rows of blankets, sleeping bags, winter gloves and coats. He served three years in the U.S. Army, having deployed in Vietnam for half the time. When he came back in 1969, Little stayed in touch with three of his fellow veterans. That is until Facebook, which he now uses to communicate with nearly 80 of his fellow battle buddies. The platform, he says, helps build a comfortability with talking about his time in Vietnam.


BAD AXE – Allison Wolschlager gets a haircut at the Veterans Resource Day last week. BAD AXE – Allison Wolschlager gets a haircut at the Veterans Resource Day last week. “It doesn’t bother me,” Little said on discussing war, “because the only way you can let go of it is by talking about it. If you hide it then you’ll just drive yourself crazy.”

Little is in touch with pilots, door gunner counterparts and more.

“We had our first reunion in Florida a few years ago,” he said.

A VFW member, Little is presently trying to convince another chapter in Maryland to fly a restored wartime Huey to the Bad Axe Post 116, but he first needs to obtain funding.

Veterans like Little were circulating in and out of the Wilcox Community Center for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs event last week. VFW organizers Ned Hilborn and his wife, Ellen, were there scouring booths and catching up with friends. In 1961, Mr. Hilborn began an eight-year tenure in the U.S. Air Force.

Allison Wolschlager, who utilized the free haircut station, served a brief stint as an Army man in 1957. Due to an eye condition, Wolschlager said he expected to be denied entry at first, yet he applied numerous times until he was accepted on the terms that he likely not last long. He received an honorable medical discharge 30 days after enlisting.

Aimed at assisting homeless or at-risk homeless veterans and their families, agencies were there offering resources on employment, food, healthcare, abating drug addiction, clothing, housing and utilities.

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